Image by Renzo D'souza

GHAR: Getting Home for Abandoned, Orphaned and Children at Risk

Vulnerable I Parentless I Children at Risk 

Ensuring Care and Protection, health, education, and psychosocial support to children who are vulnerable, abandoned, orphaned and at risk.  Children who lost both parents or abandoned are placed in “Home” with the help of extended families or any family who is ready to provide long term support. Local community and other stakeholders take decisions with the participation of the child to identify and decide the best suitable family.

Image by Siddhant Soni

Every year, at least a billion children are exposed to violence. Every five minutes, a child dies a violent death (Hillis et al. 2016) somewhere in the world. The burden of violence is grave and long-lasting; child survivors of violence are at risk of long-term physical and cognitive damage, violence prevents children from receiving a quality education and reduces their capacity to learn and the impact on their economic prospects and productivity is lifelong, with victims of violence twice as likely to be unemployed later in life and much more likely to be living in poverty. (UNICEF UK, 2014). The situation is even grave for those who have lost either their parents or have been abandoned. 

 

Localism takes a system approach to ensure care and protection, health, education, and psychosocial support to children who are vulnerable, abandoned, orphaned and at risk.  Localism follows the principles of necessity and suitability to provide such alternative care. Children who have lost both of their parents or have been abandoned are placed in “Home” with the help of extended families or any family who is ready to provide long term support. Local community and other stakeholders take decisions with the participation of the child to identify and decide the best suitable family.