Image by Steve Johnson

Self- Reliant Families

Rural | Urban I Tribal

Using farm and non-farm based livelihood activities to augment household income. Promoting general prosperity through community-based interventions in financial inclusion, innovative agricultural practices, and sustainable agri-tech solutions. 

Image by Annie Spratt

Localism envisions a family that is protected from external shocks. These external shocks could come in various forms; not having access to quality healthcare and education, lack of income-generation opportunities, or not having access to institutionalized credits. This pushes many to migrate to cities to work in unsafe environments. Information asymmetries are also unusually high at the bottom of the pyramid that impact welfare of a family.

 

Borrowing from Anirudh Krishna's work, Localism proposes a theory of change that provides a ladder to struggling families so that they are able to come out of the trap of poverty. By asking questions such as why does poverty remain rampant in so many places? How can it be fixed? Localism believes that these problems don’t require a single monolithic solution: indeed, for solutions to really work and be sustainable, they should be as localised and context-specific as possible.

 

To this objective, Localism uses farm and non-farm based livelihood activities to augment household income. It encourages general prosperity through community-based interventions in financial inclusion, innovative agricultural practices, and sustainable agri-tech solutions